I like calorie counting – I think!

I like calorie counting – I think!

I like calorie counting – I think!

I’ve been a member of Slimming World since December 2018 and I have lost three stone ten pounds. I’m thrilled with the weight loss, but the weight loss has stalled in the last 18 months. This could be because I have a secret! When I lost the three stone ten pounds, I was also calorie counting. I know you shouldn’t do this on a Slimming World diet, but I couldn’t help it. It has been ingrained in my psyche. To lose weight, you have to have a calorie deficit. The philosophy of Slimming World is that you have free foods and can eat as many of those as possible. Some of those free foods are high-protein foods like meat, fish or eggs. Other foods are high-carbohydrate foods like potatoes, pasta and rice.

I know that my body doesn’t do very well with carbohydrates. For example, I put on a pound or two for the next 48 hours whenever I eat rice. It has become a habit within my household that rice will not be consumed on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. Because my weigh day is on a Thursday evening and I want to have a weight loss. This becomes very restrictive when you are a celiac. Although gluten-free pasta is available, it’s just not as nice as rice or potatoes. Hands up here, I would be thrilled to sit down to a bowl of white rice and salt for a meal. I love rice. I find it to be one of my comfort foods.

Calorie Counting with Slimming World

I have therefore decided that I am going to put the Slimming World diet, or I should say, healthy eating plan, to one side for a few months, sort of. Although I intend to go to my Slimming World group every week and weigh in because I like the group camaraderie. I also like the accountability of weight control and management. “My fitness pal” has already been downloaded to my mobile phone and will start calorie counting to lose weight over the next two months on my weight loss journey. I will not inform my group leader that I am doing this, as I intend to run both plans side by side, as I did previously.

I will use the Slimming World philosophy of the food I will eat. But instead of looking at the foods as free, I will weigh each item and count its calorific number. For example, suppose I will have a jacket potato, baked beans and side salad, which is all free on the Slimming World plan. In that case, I will have the potato but will weigh it for the calorie intake, and the beans and side salad. I will follow the Slimming World plan kind of. I will keep a log of what I eat and my weight over the next two months to see the difference. But I want to see if this will work.

As it stands at the moment, I only have another two stones, but I want to lose that two stones. Then I will create some low calorie, high filling and exciting meals. I want to enjoy my food again and plan meals; I will look forward to eating. For example, a Roast Chicken on a Sunday. It also has to be a plan that I will then be able to stick to long term. I understand the calorie deficit way of dieting. It has worked for me before. I know the number of calories my body needs to use daily to survive. My Basal Metabolic Rate is 2032. I can eat up to 2032 calories to maintain my current weight. Anything over that, I will put on weight. Anything less than that, I will lose weight.

Food should not be banned

I am fed up with looking at food and thinking they are naughty, bad or not on the plan. The thought of never eating some foods is driving me directly to that food. Then it’s not just a nibble or one biscuit; it’s the packet. I have absolutely no intention of going through my life like that. I will not look at a gin and tonic and think I can’t have that because I’ve used all my sins for today. Life is for living and enjoying. If I have to count or be on a diet, I cannot see the point for the rest of my life.

This makes me sound a little sad or despondent? But I’m not. I’m feeling genuinely energised. I’m looking forward to eating what I want to eat in the next two months and when. But within a calorie-counting regime. Also, knowing that I can eat anything and still lose weight. I can decide to have a fish finger sandwich with butter and tomato sauce when I want and not worry that I already had my healthy B or save my healthy B for a HIFI bar. Now I will have the opportunity to decide what I will eat and when. If I want to eat four slices of bread, I will. (Of course, Gluten-free bread is OK, but you just can’t eat that many slices).

I will keep you informed about how I’m doing, and what the result will be? When I weighed myself this morning, and I was 86.2. I have been very strict with myself and followed the Slimming World diet the last couple of days, and I have actually put on half a kilo. This is probably why I’m looking at an alternative.

Slimming World has about 2000 calories per day

Interestingly, suppose you actually work out the calorie content of an average day’s slimming world eating plan. In that case, you’ll be surprised to find out that calories workout to be around 2000 per day. That has to be wrong, and therefore when you stick to plan, you don’t permanently lose weight. If you are on a Slimming World eating plan, try it. Count calories for just one week, and see the results.

I’m looking forward to calorie counting. I have my tools ready, and I will let you know the weight loss I have achieved with my new calorie counting action plan.

Gluten Free Bread

Gluten Free Bread

Gluten-Free Bread

On the Slimming World Fast Forward plan, I rediscovered one of my favourite breakfasts. Poached egg on toast. Ok, so I may have made one slight change. I’m not too fond of soggy toast. I don’t know why, but just the thought of it turns my stomach. My poached egg is always on bread. Typically I would add some butter to the bread, but I am trying to save syns and calories.

Eggs are a bit of a complex issue when poached. The poached egg has to be cooked just right. The white is not translucent, but the yoke is soft and runny. Having said that, the egg is the easiest part of the ingredients. The bread is a complicated component.

Why have gluten-free bread?

I am a celiac, which means my body cannot tolerate gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Gluten is the ingredient that makes bread, biscuits, and cakes taste divine. It is also the ingredient that combines all the other ingredients together. It gives food that stretches feel. If you take one component out of a recipe, it changes the whole product and unfortunately, bread is one product that desperately needs gluten!

Gluten-free bread is very hit and miss. Bread depends on gluten for its delicious taste, its consistency and strength. Some gluten-free bread tastes like cardboard, and that is a compliment to the bread. It’s dry, tastes of nothing, and you need half a pound of butter to eat it. Not only that, the crusts are inedible, and the size of a cream cracker and will tear when spreading butter.

What is strange about a gluten-free loaf is that it seems to last forever. Regular bread will eventually go mouldy. I have yet to see a gluten-free loaf go stale. I dread to think how the manufacturer does this. Being a celiac means I indulge in bread infrequently. It is very much a treat.

I have made some homemade gluten-free bread after buying a particular bread-making machine. The ingredients are as long as your arm. However, the bread had a very short life. It tastes fantastic once it’s finished cooking. You have to eat it immediately. It doesn’t keep very well, and I found I did nothing but eat bread for the next few days. Starting with sandwiches, then toast, and finally, bread dipped in egg. Sometimes the bread would end up in the bin. It was a very dense bread, and the time and cost weren’t worth the time and effort.

Gluten bread on the Slimming World Fast Forward Plan

The price of gluten-free bread is also extremely expensive. One small loaf of Tesco Free From Seeded Bread (Gluten-free) has about 15 slices that cost £1.80. A comparable size loaf of standard bread costs circa £0.80. Other gluten-free bread has around eight slices and can cost £1.95. Getting a more expensive loaf doesn’t mean that it will taste any better. Gluten-free bread has become easier to find and purchase over the last few years.

Tesco Free From Seeded Bread

Tesco Free From Seeded Bread. I have found a gluten-free bread that tastes nice. It’s not real bread, but it’s the closest thing I have come across. Unlike other gluten-free bread, it is soft to the touch, especially when you give it the fresh test squeeze you do with ordinary bread, There is a little bounce back, and if it were regular fresh bread, you would probably put it back on the shelf. However, for a loaf of gluten-free bread, it’s good.

More importantly, each slice of bread is 107 calories, with is comparable to other loaves. Each slice is tiny, smaller than a small loaf. It is made with rice flour, tapioca maise and potato starch and topped with a few seeds. You can see the whole ingredients below. The slice is slightly thicker than a regular sliced loaf, which is pleasantly surprising. Tesco suggests that the bread will be good for four days once opened. I have kept mine for longer with no adverse effects and no change in softness or taste.

This bread also makes delicious sandwiches. I added some coleslaw as the bread needed a little liquid. The butter must be soft as the bread will tear if too hard. If you are going to have toast, you won’t notice any difference in any style of bread. Once you have some jam or marmalade on, you think it was regular bread. Indeed, my friends have never noticed any difference when they have a slice, which is excellent praise certainly. Eating gluten-free bread is much lighter than traditional bread, and you are never left with that heavy feeling after eating.

Gluten-Free bread means free from everything

One of the sad things about being gluten-free is that the manufacturer seems to lump all things free together, so it is also wheat free and milk free. It does, however, contain eggs. You can freeze this bread but will have to wait two hours before using it. I have had no luck with freezing bread, as it always seems to taste stale.

Ingredients – taken from Tesco website

I have listed the ingredients for the bread, which will make it easier for you to decide to try it. There are a lot of items included in the bread. You can see this in the list below.

INGREDIENTS: Water, Rice Flour, Mixed Seeds (10%) [Sunflower, Linseed, Poppy, Millet], Tapioca Starch, Maize Starch, Potato Starch, Bamboo Fibre, Rapeseed Oil, Dried Egg White, Psyllium Husk Powder, Yeast, Humectant (Vegetable Glycerol), Stabilisers (Hydroxypropyl Methyl Cellulose, Xanthan Gum), Sugar, Salt, Preservatives (Calcium Propionate, Potassium Sorbate), Apple Extract.

Conclusion

In conclusion, I like this bread. I have, in fact, purchased four loaves since finding them on the shelves in Tesco. On a score out of 10 for this bread, I would give it an 8. It’s one of the best tasting bread celiacs can eat, and it is a reasonable price. You can eat the bread without butter (but some liquid will need to be added, coleslaw or a runny egg). It is worth trying to see what you think. Would love to hear your feedback.

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